Changes

Been a lot of changes going on behind the scenes recently and I just realised it’s been an age since I posted an update. Despite of the volume of stuff this is going to be brief:

Here on the website I’ve removed the t-shirt/apparel shop. I like Spreadshirt, it’s a nice platform, but it’s tricky to make it work for all folks all over the world and I haven’t got the resources (mostly time) to configure a solution that fulfills the remit fully. I will continue making designs but they will be available through my Etsy store instead.

Etsy store? Yes, it is true. I will add the links to my page soon. I’m streamlining operations and moving all my products other than fabric onto Etsy. I have a fair old heap of new work heading to the Fashion Formula and Spoonflower shops soon, much of which I am very pleased with.

I hit pause on the t-shirt project because it was eating up too much energy in the old form. About a third of the way through but I’m going to pick it up again. It will be very different but I’m looking forward to it!

Days #13 and #14

Missed a day updating the blog as I tried to keep on top of the creative work itself. I've been pondering how to make the most of this project and discussing the goals with another creative over on Instagram. I was not in need of a 100-day project myself to get work on track and ideas flowing. Procrastination isn't really a problem for me and I love to make new work every single day.

My own take on the 100-day project is that it gives me a structure which forces me into creating a large body of work rapidly and to focus intensively. The matter of interest for me is really how to make sure that the effort of daily practice pays the greatest dividend.

A daily routine of creative work is great, but I've seen folks undertaking (and completing) projects like this without making great leaps forward. On the other hand, I have also seen others taking enormous strides forward while working through a project, in some cases going from noob amateur to professional level in a matter of weeks. I'm not kidding.

Getting better at this pace has nothing to do with talent, it has to do with how we learn. The ten minutes (or more) a day that it takes to actually make a piece of creative work should be supplemented by as much time as possible in reflection and study. We need to think about what can be improved, what we like and don't like, and to have time to look at solutions to what we discover. If we can find examples to compare our work to, find the best, put ours alongside it and look for the ways in which we can get better.

Anyone who undertakes to produce a piece a day but only produce and not to reflect, will finish with 100 pieces but probably, in many cases, having made only a little progress. I'm not going to say 'no progress' and I'm not arguing that getting through isn't an achievement in itself - it absolutely is and that's the entire point for many people - but with limited time available I am trying to wring every benefit possible out of this effort. 

Black and red asymmetrical scrawl

Black and red asymmetrical scrawl

Big cat #2

Big cat #2